Tag: Professional Development

Finding Genuine Talent in the Artificial World – An Interview with Erick Swaine of Mackenzie Ryan Executive Search

Thirteenth in a series of in-depth interviews with innovators and leaders in the fields of Risk, Compliance and Information Governance across the globe. From the soon to be released book, “Tomorrow’s Jobs Today.”


Erick Swaine is a practice director for Mackenzie Ryan, a global talent recruiting firm. He specializes in Information Governance, AI and Analytics. He has placed thousands of job candidates across a wide spectrum of industries into mid-level to executive leadership positions and speaks frequently on their journeys and the mechanics of professional development. He received his Bachelor’s in Marketing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I spoke with him in July about today’s recruitment process, outsourcing strategies and the nuances of succession planning in the information age.


Erick, you were an early pioneer in helping employers understand the value and talent that information governance, AI, and analytics professionals offered when these disciplines were in their infancy. How has the demand for these emerging fields transformed recruiting in the job market?

There’s a lot to unpack there as it relates to tech itself, the demand for these emerging fields and how that has transformed over the years. I come from the industry myself. Prior to my current role I sold analytics software with built in compliance and document management capabilities. Our firm recognized value in analytics and was looking to build a technology practice. Mackenzie Ryan, which split off from Personify last year (both held under Mackenzie Ryan Holdings) didn’t have it when I came abroad so they went to their private equity VC partners and asked them, “Where are you investing as it relates to technology?” There was a resounding theme around electronically stored information. This was about a dozen years ago. At that point not everyone had a content management system. The players were SharePoint, OpenText, and OnBase and companies like Stellent, which was later picked up by Oracle, and Filenet, which was picked up by IBM. But they hadn’t penetrated all the markets. Early on the investment was in Content Management and overall repositories. It was really a soup-to-nuts storage of data, you know, manipulating workflows for all components of information management.

Overall, the human capital demand is there because of the efficiency that you can create by understanding your data. The newfound efficiency is driving advanced analytics and AI over the last five to six years, with massive amounts of investments around how we make decisions around these resources. This strategy requires the right talent.

As companies started to evolve, and you had social media come into play, around the same time, there were massive amounts of electronically stored data being created. Although storage kept getting cheaper and cheaper, there was a lot of regulation coming out requiring governance of data. Many of them looked at the discipline of Information Governance as a cost only, and then hopped over into advanced analytics. Over the last three or four years, they have moved more into Artificial Intelligence.

Yet, it’s all about making sense of the data that we’re already storing, and probably not defensibly disposing of. What the new technology has done for both large and small employers is really allow these companies to make data-driven decisions, and they drive those decisions based on a lot of historical legacy data. We noticed there are several companies that either used advanced analytics platforms or AI for internal knowledge management (to enhance institutional knowledge and train their people better), or they began aggregating and analyzing the data in order to develop additional revenue streams externally.

Overall, the human capital demand is there because of the efficiency that you can create by understanding your data, and that has driven, especially in advanced analytics and AI over the last five to six years, massive amounts of investments around how we drive decisions around these resources. Continue reading “Finding Genuine Talent in the Artificial World – An Interview with Erick Swaine of Mackenzie Ryan Executive Search”

My Hope for ARMA International

My Hope for ARMA International

For almost 65 years, ARMA International has provided an exceptional level of educational value, professional resources and guidance to members of the information management field and business community. Those efforts have aided organizations in recognizing the importance of RIM/IG practitioners’ unique skillsets and helped incorporate them into their IT and governance programs. Indeed, both public and private entities benefit enormously from the mission of this organization, which much like its subject matter, has swiftly transformed to meet evolving civic and corporate demands. This rich history and dedication to its members, the business community and the public is exactly what I’d like to see continue in the coming decade. But my hope would also be for all of our membership, from fellows on down, to more enthusiastically apply the insight, lessons and strategies they’ve acquired over their careers to help ARMA in both achieving its long-term strategic plans and in exceeding its annual goals.

ARMA can lead the way by developing and fostering cutting edge information strategies that sit on the peaks of this new horizon and by driving the conversations that illuminate the valleys in between.

For the last twenty years I’ve held prominent leadership roles at both Fortune 500 companies and revered legal firms including Farmers Insurance, Paramount Pictures, Relativity Media and Kilpatrick Townsend. My work history has taken me from the trenches of service bureaus to the hot seat of penthouse boardrooms. Along the path I’ve attained a set of credentials beginning with a CRM from the Institute of Certified Records Managers in 2013, followed by an IGP from ARMA International in 2014. In June of 2016 ARMA International selected me for its Member Profile and in 2017 my team’s efforts at Farmers Insurance earned us ARMA’s coveted Excellence for an Organization Award. Because of all this I am eternally grateful for the opportunities which ARMA has provided along my career path. I’ve also been affiliated with the local ARMA-GLA chapter for the better part of the last decade and had the chance to see how powerful and influential a local chapter can be in bringing education and awareness to members of the organization as a whole. Those chapters need our resilient support and their leaders deserve most of the credit for keeping ARMA together all these years. They are the pillars of this intellectual edifice.

The next few years will see organizations in all industries balancing a world ripe with business opportunities with an evolving universe of risk and regulations. Technology, processes, people and the associations they subscribe to are being forced to adapt to this dynamic new digital landscape in both their personal and professional lives. ARMA can lead the way by developing and fostering cutting edge information strategies that sit on the peaks of this new horizon and by driving the conversations that illuminate the valleys in between.ARMA International

As we dive into the second decade of the 21st century, I want ARMA to emerge as a defining voice in the global digital disruption and transformation discussion. By the same token, the professional development and success of ARMA’s members is central to that voice being heard loud and clear. The imminent need for effective information governance throughout the software and document lifecycle will likely broaden ARMA’s appeal to groups, professionals and verticals once unfamiliar with its offerings. In continuing to partner with and perhaps exploring mergers or acquisitions of like-minded organizations and businesses, ARMA can enhance its niche, enrich the knowledge offering and bolster its network.

With the right choices, ARMA is poised to stand as a premier educational and professional service offering for this brave new world, in part by having established itself as the knowledge and resource mecca for Information Governance standards, but equally as a promoter and champion of its members, helping them connect to tangible digital transformation solutions. This means enabling and encouraging our colleagues to rise to the challenges that will shape and define the newest careers in the Information Age.

ARMA should also find new ways to play an instrumental role in highlighting and refining best practices and approaches around not just Enterprise Content Management but Big Data, Blockchain, AI, Privacy, the Internet of Things and Quantum Computing. It must pursue unique engagements with new corporate sponsors who are at the forefront of much of the change and innovation we’re witnessing. I would hope ARMA would want to have a valued and notable sponsorship level presence at the major technology conferences in the coming years including BoxWorks and BlackHat which are hungry for our narrative and talent. ARMA must strive to remain platform agnostic but must also accept the realities of dominant technologies and embrace their significance.

The association should work closely with the legal, regulatory and ethical bodies and communities that study the impact of digital transformations on businesses as well as the individual in society. This need is evidenced by the increase in privacy regulations and laws recently passed in the EU and in the United States. Building on these relationships will lend credibility to our certifications and designations. That credibility should in turn be used by ARMA leaders and members to participate in media commentary on newsworthy information management events and issues. ARMA should strive to have those perspectives sourced by popular media and journalists alike, thus bringing further recognition to the organization and marketing its relevance. ARMA should act to elevate its experienced speakers as well as new disruptive voices. Our expertise is newsworthy and needs to be heard!

The next few years really are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to seize on this demand for Information Governance solutions and tap the potential of the professional community that supports it. My hope is that community will be the people that love and celebrate ARMA.


Rafael Moscatel, CRM, IGP, is the Managing Director of Compliance and Privacy Partners, LLC. Reach him at 323-413-7432, follow him on Twitter at @rafael_moscatel or visit http://www.capp-llc.com

Document Strategy Forum Next Week! My Session – Executing the Information Governance Strategy for the Post-Cloud World

Content. Communication. Strategy.

I’ve attended and spoken at many different “information management” conferences over the years and each has their strengths and weaknesses. But I’m especially excited to speak at DSF ’19 this year, sponsored by companies like OpenText, Quadient, Adobe, PitneyBowes and Doculabs. Why am I so thrilled? Besides the fact that I get to share my thoughts and experiences for the first time representing Compliance & Privacy Partners, this conference is practitioner driven, with a stellar board of advisors that has spent time with its presenters, making sure the content fits the program tracks AND elevates the conversation.

At the very heart of all the buzz surrounding “big data and artificial intelligence (AI) lives a universal truth- Information is the critical asset of every organization. Information flows through people and applications at such a rapid pace that it demands effective management. Enterprises are flying blind if they don’t have an information management strategy. It is impossible to understand customer needs and improve their experiences without the right information feeding decision making systems. Without proper management of info, employee engagement is doomed. The bottom line is that effective information management will dictate critical decisions for both internal and external facing processes that bring the intersection of employees and customers into context. –David Mario Smith in the latest Document Strategy Magazine

I’ll be presenting a best practices deck on Executing the Information Governance Strategy for the Post-Cloud World in the Automation of Information track, covering Records Compliance, Legal Hold Software and Enterprise Architecture Tools.

Agenda:

  • How to build and automate your Information Governance strategy using the right policies, technology, and stakeholders
  • How to recognize the right collaboration opportunities and strategically partner on the projects most likely to support and advance your agenda
  • What approaches to take when introducing your plans to senior leadership and how to effectively manage the optics around your contributions to your company’s bottom line

Tickets may be available if you act now but the event is quickly selling out. You can learn more here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Turning Collective Wisdom Into Strength – An Interview with Andrea Kalas of the Association of Moving Image Archivists

Turning Collective Wisdom Into Strength - An Interview with Andrea Kalas of the Association of Moving Image Archivists

Fourth in a series of in-depth interviews with innovators and leaders in the fields of Risk, Compliance and Information Governance across the globe.

Andrea KalasAndrea Kalas is a recent President of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) and a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Prior to her current role at Paramount Pictures as SVP of Archives, she led the preservation program at the British Film Institute. I had the opportunity to sit down with her in June to discuss bit loss, digital asset management, artificial intelligence and the benefits that millennials are bringing to the profession.

Andrea, you’ve spoken and taught at length about the challenges of bit loss and how it affects the race to preserve not just America’s rich film history, but that of other countries and cultures. How does a global team like yours even begin to prioritize its preservation goals as you race against the clock?

Digital preservation has the basic goal of avoiding bit loss, technically. However, the work that really requires technologists and archivists to effectively collaborate involves the treatment of files as valuable records, art or artifacts. This goes against so much of how basic information technology systems work. For example the word “archive” has been used as a term to mean data written off-line and put on removable media on a shelf, never to be touched again. This is a sure path to bit loss. For an archivist this definition is completely counter-productive. It as much about communication and clear technical requirements from archivists as it is building technical solutions. What we’ve developed is an infrastructure that makes sure there are multiple copies of our feature films, and that each file that makes up that film is checked annually. We’ve also worked hard at making sure that we’ve architected things so that as hardware and software change, which they inevitably to, the files and metadata that make up that film can survive. This keeps us on track with what we have to preserve. That and the incredibly brilliant archivists who work with me and bring innovation to the process as it evolves.

Aside from the importance of preserving history and the arts, what are the other benefits of preservation for large intellectual property firms like those in the Entertainment industry?

Entertainment companies who base their business plans on the ability to distribute films and television programs over the long term benefit from the preservation of their intellectual property both financially and culturally. The cultural aspect is often called in business terms, “branding,” or the public recognition of the value of that company. A film studio who demonstrates it cares as much about a film that has great public and cultural appreciation as it has financial benefit enhances its brand. These two reasons are why those who own intellectual property have a duty of care. Like many distributors, we have some titles we distribute for a short period of time, and other for which we have long-term rights. It is the latter we preserve.

Some argue that AI was kickstarted by image repository work thanks to the efforts of academics like Fei-Fei Li at Stanford. Companies like Zorroa, for example, are now developing tools for visual asset management that integrate machine learning algorithms so users can auto-classify assets. This must be promising considering the volume of materials we must now manage. Are projects like this on the horizon for other studios or is it still cost prohibitive?

Read the entire interview and more in my new book on leadership in the information age, Tomorrow’s Jobs Today.

Directing The Flow Of Information – An Interview with Jones Lukose of The International Criminal Court

Directing The Flow Of Information – An Interview with Jones Lukose of The International Criminal Court

Second in a series of interviews with leaders in the fields of Risk, Compliance and Information Governance across the globe.


Jones LukoseJones Lukose, MBA, PhD is the Information Management Officer for the Criminal Court in the Hague and has over twenty years of experience developing and implementing strategies to achieve operational effectiveness and regulatory compliance for engineering firms, in energy and utilities sectors as well as for international and judicial organizations in Africa, Europe and the Americas. I interviewed him this past February to learn more about his unique insights into information management fundamentals and our future.


Jones, your work and research has taken you to many corners of the world including Kenya, Rwanda, Botswana, Jamaica, Uganda, the UK and now the Netherlands. It’s there you presently direct an important Information Governance program for the International Criminal Court.

What do you consider the most common theme in the information management challenges you’ve faced across so many unique cultures and how has that experience shaped how you think about solutions for international organizations?

I have worked in organisations where data is everywhere but the common challenge has been that it seems no one is directing its flow. There is a lot of evidence of information collected and stored that does not fit with the organisation’s strategy. The organisation may say that it is going in a particular direction but the data it holds does not provide the required evidence or proof.  My experience in this regard has led me to reconsider my role in the organisation as an Information Manager. In such environments, it is my first priority to help determine the real purpose and value of data to the organisation. In other words lend a hand in crafting the strategy of the organisation by leveraging information management.

How can we, as information management practitioners, as data stewards, effectuate best practices in our workplace in the face of constant, sometimes paradigm shifting changes in technology?

We now live in a world where small sets of information can alter the economies of the most powerful organisation and states on the planet. It is a world, where small streams of sensitive information can digitally leak and cause violent reactions from people living far and beyond the source. Tiny words or images transported via exotic technology can lead to wide-spread panic across whole populations even wars. A world where information is fragmented infinitely raising an infinite number of world views and identities. It is a world where the same information is interpreted differently in space and time. It is a world where information is presented in constant flux with the only constant being surprise.

Whatever your personal convictions, I challenge you to consider that we need a new way of looking at information management. It won’t help to retreat to our old maps and models because the more frustrated we become. We need new information management techniques to navigate the chaos, filter the wrong and point us to the significant. The new information manager will thrive and even love to embrace the chaos of information by applying new lenses and insights. He or she should be ready to be inspired to experiment and try out new ideas and solutions.

Read the entire interview and more in my new book on leadership in the information age, Tomorrow’s Jobs Today.