Tag: Careers

Tomorrow’s Jobs Today: Episode 1: Priya Keshav of Merudata Discusses Data Mapping

The inaugural webcast of Tomorrow’s Jobs Today: Wisdom and Career Advice From Thought Leaders in AI, big data, The Internet of Things, Privacy, and more. Host Rafael Moscatel picks the brains of business leaders throughout the world who are pioneering emerging technologies and leadership concepts across a variety of industries in both the public and private sectors to better understand the future of work and the incredible tools being developed to perform that work.

Full Transcript

Rafael Moscatel:

Priya, we’re going to talk a lot about data maps today, and you have a lot to show us there. But before you treat us to kind of the bells and whistles on your product, I do want to talk briefly about why you decided to start this business. You had an excellent position for one of the big four accounting firms, and you were doing some amazing work over there for them. So tell me: Why did you take this leap?

Priya Keshav:

Data is going to be one of the biggest risks for every enterprise in the next decade or so, and that’s broader than just cybersecurity risk. And most gender councils acknowledge this and are looking to build programs in-house to manage this proactively. I felt that most of the programs so far are consultant-driven, and there was a lack of products that supported these programs in a holistic manner. And I felt that there was a gap that perhaps we could address, so we founded Maru, and it’s been an excellent journey so far.

Rafael Moscatel:

So Priya, for some of our viewers that are very new to IT infrastructure and data maps, can you give us a basic definition of what a data map is?

Priya Keshav:

Yeah, it is a bird’s-eye view of all the data within the organization. For somebody who is trying to manage the risk around the data at a very high level, it provides all the details, in terms of the number of systems, where the data originated, how it flows. And you’re able to look at which systems are riskier, versus not. You’re able to understand the security controls that you have in place. So you can bring all of the information into one single place and take a look at it for various decision-making purposes, and that’s what the data map gives you.

Rafael Moscatel:

Now that you’ve told us exactly what a data map is, can you tell us a little bit more about why it’s important in today’s climate, with all of the privacy compliance exercises that companies need to undertake?

Priya Keshav:

The best way to explain this is with an elephant story that actually one of my mentors first told me. A bunch of blind men, who had never seen an elephant before, encountered an elephant. And they were experiencing this elephant in various ways, right? So somebody touched … One person touched the trunk. Somebody else was looking at the tail and obviously had a completely different description of what the elephant was. And somebody else was touching the body and had a very different description of the elephant. That’s true in most organizations. We are siloed.

We have a very good understanding of what we are doing with the data that we see and how we are using the data that we have, but it lacks perspective, and that’s what happens in most organizations. So you have perspectives. None of them are wrong, but the perspectives are limited, from a certain viewpoint. And what data map helps in cross-functional. So it brings collaboration. It helps in establishing true trust in data because now you have a true understanding of what is going on with your data. And it’s not just for compliance, though obviously, it gives you better control over compliance efforts. But it gives you, also, better visibility into your data.

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Meeting Evolving Business Needs – A Conversation Between RIM Educators and Thought Leaders

Earlier this month I had the honor and privilege of speaking at the MERv conference with Dr. Gregory S. Hunter, Dr. Tao Jin, Dr. Patricia Franks, Rae Lynn Haliday, Cheryl Pederson, and Wendy McLain on the topic of Meeting Evolving Business Needs – A Conversation Between RIM Educators and Thought Leaders. In response to requests, below are some excerpts from my transcribed remarks.

Session Description: This special, two-part panel discussion facilitated by the ICRM will compare current academic curricula with the existing ICRM exam to identify gaps and areas of improvement for both academia and the ICRM. University Professors will discuss their programs and IG industry leaders will add perspective from the business world.

ON THE QUESTION OF WHAT DO MANY JOB SEEKERS STUDENTS WANT TO KNOW?…

It’s really a surreal time to be having a discussion about meeting evolving business needs don’t you think? Of course, we’re doing this conference virtually for the first time, and pivoting towards presenting in this fashion is kind of representative of that evolution we’re here to talk about. You know one thing I think Records and Information Governance professionals excel at though is supporting organizations through digital transformation initiatives, and I imagine the reason that so many companies are able to move forward at such an accelerated pace today, despite COVID, is because they’ve already experienced in getting their records and information online. And I see more of that demand in the days and years ahead but also see significant risks.

But first I want to start this discussion with a sampling of questions shared with me by Tao Jin at LSU…. And I would assume it’s similar to the questions asked by students at some of the other schools with curriculums like LSU. Because I think part of framing this discussion is, you know, trying to understand what students and job seekers are actually asking as they consider these programs and navigating the job marketplace. And I’m not surprised that a majority of the questions shared here are related to emerging technologies.

One thing I think Records and Information Governance professionals excel is supporting organizations through digital transformation initiatives, and I imagine the reason that so many companies are able to move forward at such an accelerated pace today, despite COVID, is because they’ve already experienced in getting their records and information online.

I’ve had my own CRM designation about 7 years now and I can tell you the exam, and these University offerings go well beyond my original training which, at the time still focused primarily on micrographics, if you can imagine that. The exam has changed since then to address new technology and innovation. But that’s not entirely the role of the Records and Information Governance professional, is it? There are other important areas of course like management…. And I think the next panel will discuss that… But the one thing I want us ALL to think about today is this…. Are we generalists? Or are we specialists? I think it’s maybe a little bit of both…

And I think whatever direction individuals take, businesses are going to want their candidates to be well versed in emerging technologies as well as core ones, which we’re going to ask you about in just a moment.

ON LATEST TRENDS – INCREASED DIVERSIFICATION AND DEMAND…

We’ve all heard about job losses post-COVID, but I wanted to diverge from that headline for a moment and bring up what I see as some good news. And that is, from a career standpoint we are witnessing professionals with IG skillsets increasingly being tapped to lead technology upgrades, digital transformation projects, and cross-functional teams in a number of sectors. I think we’re seeing this trend for a lot of reasons. I’ve put an image up here from LinkedIN. It’s essentially a snapshot of a job search query. And I encourage you all to do this yourselves so you can see how diverse roles have become in just in a short amount of time. It’s not surprising how much of today’s work and technology now requires a solid foundation in good recordkeeping, database, and systems design. And recruiters are looking for that education and experience.

ON LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AMIDST THE CONVERGENCE OF TECHNOLOGY AND REGULATORY PRESSURES…

Although it’s not yet mainstream in every business, we do know that Big Data, IoT, and other emerging technologies are certainly driving some of the need for IG professionals. But it’s also a desire to find talent that can integrate privacy, data governance, and other best practices into those technologies, isn’t it?

An additional layer of assurance just makes good business sense and that layer is made possible by the talent that understands and can implement IG, especially around data governance.

Specifically, with the convergence of technology and regulatory pressures, we are seeing a specialized need for the RIM or IG professional to come in and ensure that operations, risk, and long-range planning value data governance, and that decisions about data protect the organization and prepare it for the next wave of innovation…. That’s how we make the most impact, by tying together stakeholders, prioritizing goals, and helping the corporate culture as a whole recognize the value of these data-driven initiatives and our individual contributions to them. IG reflects the thirty-thousand-foot view of the business with the experience of having been in the weeds with risk, compliance, and internal audit of its moving parts.

Employers. Their executives… and their attorneys, they all realize this. And the headlines around ransomware, GDPR fines, they’ve all prompted companies to revisit and invest in the way they tackle their biggest challenges. They know that an additional layer of assurance just makes good business sense and that layer is made possible by the talent that understands and can implement IG, especially around data governance, right?

That’s how we make the most impact, by tying together stakeholders, prioritizing goals, and helping the corporate culture as a whole recognize the value of these data-driven initiatives and our individual contributions to them.

So, I think those that succeed are those that try in earnest to gain the respect of their IT counterparts. They demonstrate adequate knowledge of the toolsets they’re working with. It’s not that you need to know how to program or code per se, but you do need to know the vocabulary, the big concepts behind what is going on to get buy-in for your portion, and to exchange ideas efficiently.

ON MOVING FROM GATEKEEPER TO CHANGE AGENT…

My colleagues and I are convinced more each day that closely aligned with these new opportunities created by technology is the personnel function of change. And I don’t think that means IG pros give up their methodologies or best practices or risk-averse perspectives, but they do need to embrace the demands thrust upon them. They have to move from defense to offense.

Ultimately, our role is no longer gatekeeper. Our role is part diplomat, part subject matter expert, part change agent. And I’d like to see educators start shaping those expectations with students and businesses as well.

I talk a lot about this in my new book, Tomorrow’s Jobs Today. Take a look at some of the job openings being put out there on LinkedIn, that I referenced earlier. In each job description, although it might not say Records Manager, you can pretty easily identify that recruiters and companies are looking to fill that type of role, or support the function in one way or another. Privacy Manager, Enterprise Project Lead, Risk Analyst, GRC consultant, etc.

And actually, groups like the ICRM, they play a critical role in communicating to employers exactly how their membership and certification programs deliver the competencies they need to drive new projects forward. But they need to understand. Ultimately, our role is no longer gatekeeper. Our role is part diplomat, part subject matter expert, part change agent. And I’d like to see educators start shaping those expectations with students and businesses as well.

Technology is the main driver of our evolving profession. And it’s not simply about document management and enterprise content management infrastructures, but now about AI, Blockchain, IoT. This is a direction that the MER conference has illustrated for years now. So, I think it’s imperative for educators and curriculums to offer primers on what a distributed ledger is, the basics of natural language processing, technical requirements of the GDPR, and similar topics.

Rafael Moscatel, CIPM, CRM, IGP, is the Managing Director of Compliance and Privacy Partners. He has developed large-scale information management, privacy, and digital transformation programs for Fortune 500 companies such as Paramount Pictures and Farmers Insurance. His latest book, Tomorrow’s Jobs Today, is available soon from John Hunt Publishing. Contact him at www.capp-llc.com or follow him on Twitter @rafael_moscatel.

AIIM Conference 2020 Keynote – Tomorrow’s Jobs Today – Rafael Moscatel

Full transcript below

Welcome to the AIIM 2020 Keynote Session Tomorrow’s Jobs Today, thinking beyond information management.

I’m Rafael Moscatel, I’m an AIIM member, and I’ve had the distinct pleasure of attending several of its thought leadership events over the past few years and had the opportunity to meet and become friends with many of you.

There isn’t much that could keep me away from an event like this, and I’m disappointed that I can’t be with you in Dallas, but I just became a father again, and it’s my first few weeks on the job. So I’m kind of afraid to ask for any time off yet!

Luckily, it’s a detail-oriented role, which is perfect because my background is in Compliance and Privacy, and I’ve spent most of my career building data governance programs for recognized brands like Paramount Pictures and Farmers Insurance.

But whether it’s a classic motion picture company or a premiere insurance group, I’ve learned that my ultimate goal isn’t just managing risk but rather elevating Information Governance and being an integral part of the “mission” of whatever organization I’m a part of. For a film studio, that’s producing content, and entertaining your audience. For an insurance carrier, the goal is to protect people’s livelihoods and helping us get back on our feet after a disaster.

So, whatever our organization’s mission might be, it’s imperative to connect “the what we do” to “the why we do it.” And that’s one of the wisest lessons I’ve learned from colleagues here at AIIM, like Michael Jay Moon, Dux Raymond Sy and some of the other leaders you have on the stage today.

It’s a big reason I wrote the book Tomorrow’s Jobs Today….

I interviewed almost two dozen trailblazing information management leaders in fields like AI, Blockchain, Big Data and Privacy from world-renowned organizations like Price Waterhouse Coopers, the International Criminal Court, and Iron Mountain to understand what their mission was and how they applied their unique skillsets in pursuit of that greater good.

The lessons I picked up in speaking with these folks should resonate with an information management professional. Despite their industry and diverse roles, three things stood out. First, they knew how to recognize an opportunity.

Take Ashish Gadnis of BanQu. Ashish grew up dirt poor on the streets of India, and following a life-changing experience in Africa, he developed a fantastic app that leverages the same technology behind Cryptocurrency, blockchain, to help the most deprived people and farmers in the world. By using his app, even if you’re in the last mile of a supply chain, you can establish your economic identity, better assert your value in society, and escape poverty. He saw the unequal gaps between significant brands, middle-men, and farmers on a supply chain and decided to transform those gaps into opportunities.

The second lesson I learned is also a timeless one but also speaks directly to the challenges the information age and our digital deluge. It’s Less is More. We learned from pioneers like George Socha of BDO and the EDRM that particular strategy is relevant not merely in disciplines and concepts like eDiscovery, and privacy-by-design, but how you approach your career. To be strategically selective with our words, our actions and our expectations runs contrary to the human nature of a large segment of the workforce and consumers. It’s also what makes you stand out.

Finally, coming full circle, the most important lesson I learned from all of the individuals I interviewed, and that was that Relationships Matter. Enjoying and being enriched by professional relationships is above and beyond the greatest gift you can give your career. Relationship building is, has always been and will always be, the most critical skill and strategy we should practice and master.

Now, I know it’s going to be many years before my youngest enters the workforce, and jobs are going to look a lot different, but I know the valuable lessons and wisdom that have guided me in my career and exemplified by the biographies in my book will still be around.

Because although the set decorations can be changed, and the actors, and the price of insuring your most valuable assets, what stays the same is the power you have over your destiny. I know that statement’s true because I just spent a year documenting the success stories of those who swear by it.

As working professionals in the Information Age, we must strive to recognize and even anticipate emerging technological trends. But seizing upon those opportunities is possible when we choose to partner with change agents who share our vision and can work with us to transform our enterprises. We must reach beyond our teams or spheres of influence and work closely with the legal, regulatory, and ethical communities that study, measure, and moderate the impact of our technology and products on our respective fields. We need to plan and develop ourselves with a deep respect for the world that our products and services impact.

By absorbing the perspectives, challenges, and solutions of those deeply in love with and accomplished in these new careers, we can help ourselves, our friends, and our employees transform anxiety over a job search, job loss, or just the winds of change into hope, understanding, and opportunity.

As you look ahead to your career over the next year, think back to the dreams you had as a kid. And think about how every one of us is in the business of making new dreams and opportunities come true for the next generation. Because if we don’t, they’ll never leave the house.

Thanks to each of you at AIIM for inspiring me in my own career. You can find out more about your colleagues in this book by going to tomorrow’s jobs today dot om where we’ll be publishing excerpts and updates about the book, and now I’ll turn it back to you Peggy and four visionaries who exemplify some of the best qualities our AIIM community has to offer.